How to Write a Thesis Statement in 5 Quick and Easy Steps

How to Write a Thesis Statement

A thesis statement is a condensed summary of your entire essay. In one (or maximum two) sentences, it has to express everything you’re going to discuss in your paper. It is usually placed at the end of your introduction paragraph.

How to write a thesis statement that rocks? This question bothers thousands of students daily. You’ll never need to rack your brains about your thesis statements if you use the following simple algorithm.

Step 1: Formulate Your Main Conclusion

If you had just a couple of words to explain your friend the main idea of your essay, what would you say? It’s actually easy. Let’s try:

  1. Insomnia can result in poor memory.
  2. Dark chocolate is a healthy product.
  3. The unique humor is a mechanism necessary for IT programmers to succeed.

Step 2: Consider One Counterargument

Imagine your most skeptical reader who will find counterarguments and try to overcome them.

  1. All nighter can give you more time to study.
  2. Too much chocolate results in excessive weight.
  3. Practical jokes at work can be counterproductive.

Step 3: Find Your Main Strong Argument

The next step is formulating your main argument. Here’s how to write a thesis statement that can convince anyone:

  1. Sleep deprivation impairs thinking processes and judgments.
  2. Flavonoids contained in dark chocolate help prevent heart diseases.
  3. Humor is a natural stress reducer.

Step 4: Formulate an Additional Argument

Of course, no matter how strong, just one argument is not enough. Add something else to make your thesis statement and entire essay more persuasive:

  1. Healthy sleep is necessary for proper processing of information.
  2. Dark chocolate can protect skin against sun damage.
  3. Laughter stimulates immune system and counteracts the effects of stress hormones.

Step 5: Choose a Basic Formula

The formulas for a good thesis statement include (but are not limited to) the following formats:

  1. Even though counterargument Y, main conclusion X because additional argument A.
  2. Main conclusion X because main argument Z and additional argument A.
  3. Whereas counterargument Y, main conclusion X given that main argument Z.
  4. Since main argument Z and additional argument A, main conclusion X.

And using any of these formulas, combine all the elements you already have in a strong thesis statement.

  1. Even though an all nighter can give you more time to study, sleep deprivation will result in poor memory because healthy sleep is necessary for proper processing of information and insomnia impairs thinking processes and judgments.
  2. Since flavonoids contained in dark chocolate help prevent heart disease and it can protect skin against sun damage, dark chocolate is a healthy product.
  3. The unique humor is a mechanism necessary for IT programmers’ success, because humor is a natural stress reducer and laughter stimulates immune system and counteracts the effects of stress hormones.

Checklist for Testing Your Thesis Statement

Don’t hesitate to revisit your thesis statement and revise it whenever necessary. Here’s a brief checklist for testing you thesis statements:

  • ‘So what’ question. After reading your thesis statement nobody should exclaim ‘so what?’
  • Isn’t it too general?
  • Isn’t is too obvious?
  • Isn’t it boring?

How Not to Write a Thesis Statement

Whereas there are many ways how you can write your thesis statement, here are 5 ways how you should not approach it:

  • Announcing a topic.
    E.g. Cats owners and their stress levels.
  • Sitting on two stools.
    E.g. Some cat owners can reduce their stress levels, while others cannot.
  • Captain Obvious.
    E.g. Adopting a cat is a great responsibility.
  • A question.
    Should cat owners pay additional taxes?

So, now you have a pretty good idea on how (not) to write a thesis statement. Good luck and please let us know if you have any more questions.

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